Madness is Mercy

Disagreeable Goulash

The curious invitation to the ultra-private baccanal at the house on Halsey opened a door into a disturbing world for Dr. DeWinter, Edward McDowell and the foreign Francois Mustafa. The evening was unusual to say the least, and that was before the tragic suicide of young Eugene Wilcox.

Eugene Wilcox, the man . . . boy more like it . . . who they had seen smoking hashish in the basement and maniacally making threats. The chosen one, who had been personally selected by the lady of the house to join her in her boudoir. Most of him was now lying on a slab in the morgue beneath St. Mary’s. Most of him. Skull fragments, bits of brain tissue, and blood that could not be scrubbed remained behind in Ariadne Varga’s bedchamber on Halsey.

Was Eugene’s death a suicide? His behavior was certainly erratic, but why would a man kill himself on the verge of a pleasant encounter with a lovely woman? Investigations by the team revealed that he was not the first such young man to meet with an untimely end.

There was a lot that did not add up with these Hungarian Vargas, who claimed to be displaced nobility exiled from their ancestral land. Study showed Varga was not a noble name and the dissolution of the Hapsburg Empire did not dispossess nobility of land.

Stuart Portman, the bibliophile lurking upstairs at the time of Wilcox’s demise, had acted beyond squirrelly. Pompous, arrogant, and obnoxious, yes. But there is more to him than he has revealed.

Then there was the medium, Gerhardt Vwinch, whose unholy seance unleashed something supernatural and undeniable in Mustafa’s shop. Vwinch had transformed. Those damned, glowing read eyes! Those fangs that he sank into his own shoulder. What were those words he muttered crazily again? Something about ‘the mother’ and an unpronounceable name.

Tragedy and dark terror have partially revealed themselves, but at present there are more questions than answers. Only fools would delve deeper into an inquiry of such horrifying events.

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